johnsonandjohnson-logo
360b / Shutterstock.com
17 August 2016Americas

Johnson & Johnson enters partnership to tackle skin diseases

Xycrobe Therapeutics revealed yesterday, August 17, that it has entered into a research agreement with pharmaceutical company Johnson & Johnson.

The agreement is intended to provide both companies with information on how Xycrobe’s technology may be best applied to future therapeutic and commercial applications.

Xycrobe's technology consists of commensal strains from the skin engineered to grow and secrete biotherapeutics needed to help treat various skin issues.

Thomas Hitchcock, CEO of Xycrobe, said in a statement: “I am thrilled that Johnson & Johnson Consumer has elected to join us in our discovery process.”

He added: “It is our hope that this collaboration can help expedite getting our therapies into the hands of physicians and their patients who truly need better solutions.”

Xycrobe focusses on programmes that address a variety of skin issues ranging from hair loss to toenail fungus.

Currently, the focus surrounds inflammatory skin diseases including acne, psoriasis and dermatitis, conditions which affect more than 100 million people in the US alone.

Already registered?

Login to your account

To request a FREE 2-week trial subscription, please signup.
NOTE - this can take up to 48hrs to be approved.

Two Weeks Free Trial

For multi-user price options, or to check if your company has an existing subscription that we can add you to for FREE, please email Adrian Tapping at atapping@newtonmedia.co.uk


More on this story

Americas
29 January 2014   Healthcare company Covidien PLC has been told it did not infringe patents belonging to a Johnson & Johnson-owned company through using its ultrasonic dissection device.

More on this story

Americas
29 January 2014   Healthcare company Covidien PLC has been told it did not infringe patents belonging to a Johnson & Johnson-owned company through using its ultrasonic dissection device.

More on this story

Americas
29 January 2014   Healthcare company Covidien PLC has been told it did not infringe patents belonging to a Johnson & Johnson-owned company through using its ultrasonic dissection device.